Tier 4 prompts warning of rise in Christmas Day Cooking Accidents

TIER 4 PROMPTS WARNING OF RISE IN XMAS DAY COOKING ACCIDENTS

  • 49% of those preparing Christmas food have suffered an accident.
  • 1 in 10 have spilled hot fat and boiling water on themselves when cooking 
  • 1 in 5 have cut themselves preparing vegetables
  • 1 in ten children’s accidents happen in the kitchen

 

BURNS and scalds could be on the rise this Christmas as more households are forced to cook their own Christmas Dinner as a result of Tier 4 restrictions, a boiling water tap manufacturer has warned.

The warnings from Intu Boiling Water Taps, backed by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), come after Boris Johnson announced new tier 4 restrictions for London, the south-east and east of England.

People in tier 4 areas must now stay at home over Christmas and not meet up with any other households, following a surge in Covid-19 cases and alarm about a new strain of coronavirus.

And whilst Christmas should be the most magical time of the year, RoSPA statistics show a surge in accidents in the home – with most as a result of Christmas dinner cooking.

Intu Boiling Water Taps owner and founder Michael Campbell commented: “This year Christmas will be unlike any other, particularly for the 21 million people who have found themselves in tier 4.

“Households who had previously shared the burden of preparing Christmas dinner between them will now all be cooking alone and of course going to a pub or restaurant for Christmas dinner is completely off the table.

“Hot food, boiling water and sharp knives can make the kitchen particularly hazardous – particularly if alcohol is also involved or you are cooking whilst on a zoom call to loved ones.

“The team at Intu Boiling Water Taps is passionate about safety and design all our taps with safety at the core of each product. Boiling water taps have a number of safety features that help prevent burns but not everyone has access to this technology.

“We joined forces with RoSPA to issue this warning as we want people to be aware of the dangers so they can take extra care this Christmas.” 

RoSPA public health adviser Ashley Martin added: “Christmas is a busy time for A&E departments, and during 2019-20 there were 4,894 hospital admissions for scalds from hot liquids, of which around two in five (1,894) were children under-five.

“At Christmas there are lots of hot liquids around, so people need to be particularly careful to make sure that these don’t get into the hands of small children – please don’t leave hot drinks within reach, don’t leave boiling pans unattended, and ideally children should be kept out of the kitchen while cooking is taking place.

“With more home-cooking expected this Christmas, it is imperative that we take care to keep ourselves and our families safe.”

For more information visit: https://www.intuboilingwatertaps.co.uk.

Boiling water taps are safer because:

  • They stop you from handling kettles full of hot water
  • They have a spring handle safety mechanism that stops the flow of boiling water instantly when released
  • They provide instant boiling water at a steady flow with no spitting – giving you more control over the water
  • The INTU Taps are cool to the touch even when boiling water is running through the tap

 

How to treat a burn from boiling water

Many scalds can be treated at home. These first aid tips from the NHS can help you treat a boiling water burn or injury:

  • Remove the heat source to prevent further injury.
  • Apply cool running water to cool the area for at least 20 minutes. Don’t use ice, iced water, or greasy substances. Keep the person warm during this process to maintain appropriate body temperature.
  • If the burn covers a large portion of the body, don’t submerge yourself in cool water. This could cause you to lose body heat and further aggravate the injury.
  • Remove any jewellery or clothing near the affected area to reduce the temperature on the skin and allow room for swelling. If items are stuck to the burn, don’t remove them. This can cause further damage.
  • Cover the burn with a moist bandage or clean cloth. Here’s a selection of moist burn pads that can protect scalded skin.
  • If possible, elevate the burned area above heart level.
  • Don’t break any blisters.
  • Scald burns take time to heal. While mild cases can take days, more severe cases can take weeks to fully heal.

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